Board Game Review: Dixit

Dixit is a pretty game. Each card is its own tiny painting, and I love it.

Dixit falls under what I think of as a party game — more dependent on understanding your fellow players than any particular mechanical or rules based strategy. The rules support 3-6 players, but I find three a pretty limited game. It works much better with four, and although I haven't had the opportunity to play with five or six, I think that would be even better.

The idea is that for every round, one player is the leader. They pick a card from their hand, place it facedown, and give the rest of the players a one or two word clue as to what that card shows. The rest of the players then pick a card from their hands based on the clue and add it to the pile. The cards are mixed up and then turned face up. Everyone other than the leader then tries to guess which one the leader placed.

If everyone picks the leader's card, everyone but the leader gets points. If no one picks the leader's card, everyone other than the leader gets points. If some (but not all) players pick the leader's card, the leader and the folks who picked that card get more points. Everyone (other than the leader) always gets bonus points for people choosing their cards.

In practice, the scoring metric becomes easy to remember as you play. Even if it sounds like a confused mess when you lay it out. I've also found the ending score to be about when I want to stop playing naturally, too. Which is really nice since it indicates that the designers put thought (or testing time) into how long the game feels fun instead of letting it drag out.  

I've never played this with small children (like pre-teen or younger), but I really think it'd be fun for them too. You might have to limit your clues to more obvious links and use less pop culture, but honestly, you have to do that for any game with young kids.

It's a fun, chill party game with pretty artwork instead of (probably) offensive humor (looking at you Cards Against Humanity). Don't get me wrong, offensive humor can be a great way to relax with close friends. But so is pretty art and you can play it with more folks. Like your parents. Or new friends you haven't calibrated where the offensive line is yet. 

I heartily recommended Dixit to everyone, non-board gamer to occasional board gamer to hard-core board gamer. It's great for a mix of folks, drunk or sober.